Monthly Archives: August 2018

August 23, 2018

YOUR GUIDE TO WISCONSIN FARMERS’ MARKET FINDS

Wisconsin’s freshest farm stand fare

Wisconsin is a state with a tasty seasonal tradition. For more than a century, farmers’ markets have been popping up under awnings and umbrellas in communities throughout Wisconsin, offering food lovers a chance to taste the state’s freshest fruits and vegetables without having to pull a single weed. Partake in this tradition throughout the growing season in spring, summer and fall—here are a few of our favorite Wisconsin markets.

Rhinelander Area

This Northwoods community is home to the legendary Hodag and so much more. Rhinelander has great hiking trails, fishing and boating lakes and lively attractions. On Saturdays in Pioneer Park, you’ll find the Hodag Farmers’ Market. It runs late May/early June through mid-October and features a variety of delicious items produced by local vendors.

Learn more about things to see and do in Rhinelander.

Rusk County

This picturesque county in northwestern Wisconsin is for people who love the outdoors. Rusk County has four picturesque rivers (the Flambeau, Jump, Chippewa and Thornapple), and it’s home to the scenic Blue Hills, the remnants of an ancient mountain range that’s heavily forested and can be explored by hiking, biking and ATV trails. Not far from the Blue Hills you’ll find the village of Bruce, which hosts a great community market on Friday afternoons from June through October. Purchase local produce, baked goods, meats and much more. On Wednesday afternoons and Saturday mornings, vendors converge in Ladysmith for the Rusk County Farmers’ Market.

Learn more about Rusk County.

West Bend

A short drive from Milwaukee, West Bend is an easy and attractive fall getaway destination. It’s the Geocaching Capital of the Midwest™, boasting over 1,600 caches within a 10-mile radius, and it’s home to some great art and history museums. Every Saturday, from late may until late October, a farmer’s market draws food lovers to Old Settlers Park in downtown West Bend. Shoppers browse stands loaded with fresh produce from local farms and orchards.

Learn more about West Bend’s events and attractions.

Marshfield

In this charming central Wisconsin community, there’s a lot to explore. There’s a zoo that has two rare twin Kodiak bears, a collection of creatures from the “iron age,” and the world’s largest round barn. These attractions are enough to make you hungry—head to the Pick N’ Save on Central Avenue on Tuesday mornings for local produce, flowers, baked goods, artisan crafts, and more. Find more things to do in Marshfield.

Hungry for more? Learn more about Wisconsin’s rich travel destinations.

 

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August 15, 2018

YOUR GUIDE TO WISCONSIN’S EXTRAORDINARY CHEESEMAKERS

You won’t brie-lieve these cheeses

Wisconsin is a state that loves cheese, and its cheesemakers are second to none, producing varieties that win international awards while delighting customers back home. Here are a few of our favorite Wisconsin cheese producers—ones that produce classics like cheddar and curds but also have a few surprises in their cheese cases.

Bring on the heat: Nasonville Dairy, Marshfield

This family-owned cheese factory is a Marshfield institution. Nasonville Dairy been around 150 years and has been wowing generations of cheese lovers with its unique varieties like Scorpion Cheddar. As you might guess, this scorpion has a sting—it tops the charts at 500,000 Scoville Heat Scale Units (that’s hotter than a Habanero pepper)! But it’s not even the hottest cheese in this dairy. Nasonville‘s Carolina Reaper clocks in at a whopping 1.57-2.2 million Scoville units—that’s a cheese that’s perfect for adventurous eaters (and maybe even home defense)! Nasonville makes 80 varieties of cheese, including plenty of delicious mild flavors like Colby Jack Marble Cheese. Learn more.

Sample the success: Carr Valley Cheese, Middleton

Carr Valley Cheese has been around for a century, and the current cheesemaker at the helm has won more national and international awards than any cheesemaker in North America. Sid Cook is a certified master cheesemaker who received his first cheesemaking license in 1968 at age 16. He’s taken his craft to the highest level, and his Canaria, Sweet Vanilla Cardona and Swiss Almond Cheese Spread all won top honors at the 2016 World Cheese Awards. You can buy Sid’s fine cheeses at the Carr Valley Cheese retail outlet in Middleton.

The big cheese: Mullins Cheese, Stevens Point Area

This operation in the Stevens Point Area in central Wisconsin is a goliath. It makes an incredible amount of cheese, turning out 500,000 pounds a day. That works out to 35,000 pounds an hour, or nearly 10 pounds of cheese a second! To produce all this goodness, Mullins gathers milk from 750 dairy farms in 23 Wisconsin counties. It produces delicious cheddars, pepper cheeses, curds and more—75 varieties in all. Sample these delicious flavors—and take a video tour of the facility—on your next visit to Mullins’ retail operation north of Stevens Point.

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August 8, 2018

YOUR GUIDE TO WISCONSIN ROAD TRIP NECESSITIES

Get travel tipsEnjoy the open road

Wisconsin is a state for explorers. Scenic byways, engaging attractions and tempting roadside stops make driving through the Dairy State unforgettable. With more than 112,000 miles of roads, streets and highways, there are plenty of great driving options in Wisconsin. The only question is what to pack. Here are some road-tested tips that will help you get the most out of your next getaway.

Camera

Make sure your vacation memories live forever. Take time to capture some special images that you can share with friends and family. If you have a nice camera, use it—but you can also make good use of your smartphone to capture photos and videos along your journey. Check out our list of Wisconsin photo locations and tips that will help you up your Instagram game.

Beach gear

Wisconsin is a state made for beach lovers. With more than 11,000 lakes, there are endless shorelines to discover, whether it’s a hot summer day or a warm fall afternoon. At the end of the day, you can sit back and see stunning Wisconsin sunset. Here are some of our favorite beaches in Wisconsin.

A cooler

When you find that perfect locally made cheese or handcrafted beer, you’ll want to bring some home. Food can also make a great gift for a housesitter, friend or family member. Pack a cooler and get this stuff on ice! Here’s some advice on how to take a foodie trip through Wisconsin.

Your appetite

Speaking of food, arrive at your destination a little hungry. There’s nothing like a relaxing meal after a day on the road, whether it’s at a classic supper club or a farm-to-table restaurant. Here are some Dairy State restaurants that are worth the trip.

Apps

There are a ton of free travel apps that can help you find the perfect trail, discover local attractions or keep your kids entertained. Here are a few examples of free tourism apps that you can use to improve your vacation.

Gear

Enjoy your hobby in someplace new—with an equipment rack and a little extra room in your car, you can discover Wisconsin’s best paddleboarding, road biking, mountain biking , fishing or golfing.

Get more Wisconsin travel tips and ideas.

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August 1, 2018

Three Counties with Great Grouse Hunting

Wisconsin is arguably the best place in the country for ruffed grouse hunting.  The mix of older forests and newly cut over parcels gives birds the full array of foods they need to thrive. Ruffed grouse are found throughout the Badger State, but northern Wisconsin has the highest concentration. A trip into the northern forests in the fall can be quite rewarding for the grouse hunter.  Here are three of Wisconsin’s top grouse hunting counties.

Ruffed Grouse

Vilas County

With 240,000 acres of public forest land and a locals dedicated to promoting the sport, Vilas County is a fantastic place to hunt – public hunting opportunities are vast. See a list of public hunting areas open for grouse hunting in Vilas County. Ruffed grouse hunting in the Northern Highland-American Legion State Forest can be spectacular in the fall. The forest’s diverse, high-quality habitat provides everything grouse need to flourish. The hundreds of miles of old logging roads that run through the forest are the best place to start. When planning your hunt, look for sections of the forest that have areas that have recently been logged. These sections offer the greatest diversity of food sources and attract the most birds.

Oneida County

Oneida County also has a high concentration of ruffed grouse. The Northern Highland-American Legion State Forest dips down into northern Oneida County, offering outstanding hunting opportunities. But the best bet for a grouse hunter in Oneida County is hunting county land. Large tracts are located near the communities of Enterprise, Woodboro and Tripoli. These county lands have forests in various states of growth. Look for the best hunting along logging roads and the edges of large clearings.

Rusk County

Some of the finest ruffed grouse hunting in northern Wisconsin can be found in Rusk County. The mix of old and new hardwoods makes for ideal habitat. Hunters come from around the country to hunt grouse in Rusk County. The county forest land for hunting is located in the northwest corner of the county in an area known as the Blue Hills. With beautiful scenery and birds aplenty, it doesn’t get much better.

Update: Outdoorswoman Krysten Potega recently explored Rusk County. See her photos and tips.

 

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